FACTS: Using Video conference to create virtual communities of practice

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PRESENTATION

Author(s) Ana Da Silva, Mike Gilbert

Abstract

Faculty Development is a seen as fundamental responsibility of all medical schools and a critical activity in order to be able to train licensed medical professionals. In the United Kingdom the General Medical Council recognised the specific requirements of the role of educators and teachers. This regulatory body has set the standards for the approval and recognition of trainers for undergraduate and postgraduate education. Based upon the Lave and Wenger (1991) Communities of Practice model and evidence based principles around Faculty development (Steinert et al. 2006, Steinert et al. 2012) we have developed a Forum for Academic and Clinical Teachers in Swansea (FACTS). These are lunch time sessions delivered via video conference facilities. We will discuss our experience of using video conference from a practical and pedagogical perspectives.

Outline

Session outcomes: By the end of this sessions the conference participants should be able to • Understand how support to teachers is vital to ensure positive student experience • Recognise the importance of communities of practice (Lave and Wenger) specially in the context of community/professional contexts • Identify opportunities, barriers and risks for use of video conferencing within their subject/area Session outline: Faculty Development is a seen as fundamental responsibility of all medical schools and a critical activity to be able to train licensed medical professionals. In the United Kingdom the General Medical Council recognised the specific requirements of the role of educators and teachers. This regulatory body has set the standards for the approval and recognition of trainers for undergraduate and postgraduate education. The Graduate Entry Medical (GEM) programme relies on a large body of professionals that teach across many different clinical and community sites across Wales. Such teachers have little contact with the University and little access to training opportunities, yet they are responsible for delivery a substantial percentage of our programme. Additionally, teaching is often a small part of their job roles therefore their investment in educational continuum professional development is limited both in time and scope. Forum for Academic and Clinical Teachers in Swansea (FACTS) is based upon the Lave and Wenger (1991) Communities of Practice model and evidence based principles around Faculty development (Steinert et al. 2006, Steinert et al. 2012). These are lunch time sessions delivered via video conference facilities. Sessions and speakers are drawn from local faculty and cover a wide range of themes from more generic teaching, learning and assessment to more specific ones such as “Dropping clinical time to teach”. The sessions started in 2013/14, since then we have delivered nearly 50 sessions and now reaching five health boards and nine hospitals across Wales. We will present how communities of practice applies to our context and how we developed a faculty development initiative based upon the principles of such model. We will discuss our experience of using video conference from a practical and pedagogical perspectives. We will focus on the advantages and problems faced. We will share our ideas for future developments and lessons learned so that others can take this forward.

Key Words

innovation, teacher training, technology

Key Messages

• Video conference is a very useful tool to link up university and community faculty • Video conference technologies requires substantial pedagogical changes to be introduced in the session and support • Interactivity and participation from the remote sites are often limited • Using social media to enable remote participation may be a more useful way to engage audience

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